Category Archives: 7. Wireless

Study about Wlan, configuration and design.

Wireless

https://supportforums.cisco.com/t5/getting-started-with-wireless/meraki-vs-cisco-wireless-solutions/td-p/1810398

For a wireless network, for instance, I’d like to see the following setup:

1. 802.11 a/b/g/n;

2. The ability for the wireless network to identify interference;

3. Inter-WAP roaming;

4. Rogue WAP, Rogue client detection;

etc.

Whitelist – Not blocked
contained – blocked
uncointed – normal hindi ibblocked (not blocked)

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Adding AP on Meraki Cloud Controller

I. Connect your Cisco Access point to your network, It should have internet connection to reach the controller.
II. Login using your Cisco Meraki account. On Wireless Tab Choose Access Point and click Add AP’s
III. Add the MAC Address/ Serial no.
– Select AP on the list with specific Serial no.
– Click Add Access point.
IV. After adding Assign Static IP on Cisco Meraki Access point

To be continued….

Linksys Wireless Bridge

Linksys Wireless-G Access Points bridge mode will turn the access point into a wireless bridge. Wireless clients will not be able to connect to the access point in this mode.

NOTE: When an access point is configured as a wireless bridge, it will link a wireless network to a wired network allowing you to bridge two networks with different infrastructure. When the WAP54G access point is set to wireless bridge mode, it will only communicate with another Linksys Wireless-G Access Point (WAP54G).  

Deployment:

Wire1.JPG

To configure an access point as a wireless bridge, you need to perform three steps:

Checking the Wireless MAC Address of an Access Point

Setting-Up Wireless Bridge Mode on the WAP54G

Changing the LAN IP Address of the Wireless Bridge

Checking the Wireless MAC Address of an Access Point

NOTE: The following steps will be performed on the main access point using a wired computer.

Step 1:
Connect a computer to the access point.

Step 2:
Assign a static IP address on the computer. For instructions.

NOTE: To assign a static IP address on a wired Mac.

Step 3:
Open the access point’s web-based setup page.

NOTE: If you are using Mac to access the access point’s web-based setup page.

Step 4:
When the access point’s web-based setup page opens, take note of the Wireless MAC Address.

NOTE: The Wireless MAC Address you took note of will be entered on the WAP54G set as wireless repeater.

Step 5:
After obtaining the wireless MAC address of the access point, configure the other WAP54G as a wireless bridge. For instructions, follow the steps below.

Setting-Up Wireless Bridge Mode on the WAP54G

Step 1:
Connect a computer to the access point you want to configure as a wireless bridge.

Step 2:
Assign a static IP address on the computer. For instructions,.

NOTE: To assign a static IP address on a wired Mac.

Step 3:
Open the access point’s web-based setup page.

NOTE: If you are using Mac to access the access point’s web-based setup page.

Step 4:
When the access point’s web-based setup page opens, click AP Mode.

NOTE: The access point’s web-based setup page may differ depending on the access point’s version number.

Step 5:
Select Wireless Bridge and type the remote access point’s MAC address that you took note of earlier.

NOTE: Remove the colons (:) when typing the MAC address on the Remote Access Point’s LAN MAC Address field.

Step 6:

Changing the LAN IP Address of the Wireless Bridge

After configuring the access point as a wireless bridge, change its LAN IP address to avoid IP address conflict.

PD Removed and port carrier change

Ethernet Link MPS and Disconnect

If Cisco detection is used, a Cisco PoE switch generally removes PoE from a port if the switch port detects loss of Ethernet link. (If IEEE detection is used, DC or AC MPS methods detect disconnects. Power to a device can continue when an MPS signal is present, even if the Ethernet link is down.) The disconnect method depends on the connected powered device.
A Cisco switch reports when a powered device is connected or disconnected and when an Ethernet link state changes. This example shows a Cisco IP phone that was disconnected from the Ethernet port and then reconnected. The switch then detects a powered device, applies PoE, and detects MPS (Ethernet link).
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3, changed state to
down
%ILPOWER-5-IEEE_DISCONNECT: Interface Gi1/0/3: PD removed
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3, changed state to down
%ILPOWER-7-DETECT: Interface Gi1/0/3: Power Device detected: IEEE PD
%ILPOWER-5-POWER_GRANTED: Interface Gi1/0/3: Power granted
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3, changed state to up

https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/switches/lan/catalyst3750/software/troubleshooting/g_power_over_ethernet.html

When the MX appliance experiences a Ethernet port state change, an ‘Ethernet port carrier change’ event type will be logged under Monitor > Event log. The details of this event define the type of state change and port that was affected. For example, ‘device: lan0, carrier: false’ means LAN1 on the Meraki had a ‘down’ event and the Ethernet link was lost.

https://documentation.meraki.com/MX-Z/Monitoring_and_Reporting/Primary_Uplink_Status_and_Ethernet_Port_Carrier_Change_Events